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The liberal reforms

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<p style="text-align:justify;text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-list:l1 level1 lfo2"><span style="font-family:Wingdings; mso-fareast-font-family:Wingdings;mso-bidi-font-family:Wingdings">§<span style="font:7.0pt "Times New Roman""> </span></span><span style="font-family:"Helvetica","sans-serif"">Young – There were several reforms for the young; firstly, the government introduced free school meals in 1906, but this was not compulsory so many councils didn’t enforce it until 1914 when it was made compulsory. Also the nutritional quality of the meals wasn’t great, so the overall success of the act is questionable. In 1907, the medical inspections in school were introduced, but many thought this gave the school too much power. The last act was the children’s charter, a series of laws that protected children from neglect, banned sales of materials such as cigarettes to those under age and the launch of youth prisons known as borstals. </span></p>
 
<p style="text-align:justify;text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-list:l1 level1 lfo2"><span style="font-family:Wingdings; mso-fareast-font-family:Wingdings;mso-bidi-font-family:Wingdings">§<span style="font:7.0pt "Times New Roman""> </span></span><span style="font-family:"Helvetica","sans-serif"">Young – There were several reforms for the young; firstly, the government introduced free school meals in 1906, but this was not compulsory so many councils didn’t enforce it until 1914 when it was made compulsory. Also the nutritional quality of the meals wasn’t great, so the overall success of the act is questionable. In 1907, the medical inspections in school were introduced, but many thought this gave the school too much power. The last act was the children’s charter, a series of laws that protected children from neglect, banned sales of materials such as cigarettes to those under age and the launch of youth prisons known as borstals. </span></p>
   
<p style="text-align:justify;text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-list:l2 level1 lfo3"><span style="font-family:Wingdings; mso-fareast-font-family:Wingdings;mso-bidi-font-family:Wingdings">§<span style="font:7.0pt "Times New Roman""> </span></span><span style="font-family:"Helvetica","sans-serif"">The Workers – in 1909 Labour Exchanges were made, but these did not increase the amount of jobs available in the country, so were relatively ineffective during periods of economic instability. Later on, starting in 1911, the National Insurance Act was brought in, in two parts. Part 1 dealt with health insurance. All men and women in lower-paid manual and clerical jobs earning under£160 per year had to join. They then had to pay 4''d ''out of each week’s wages, and each payment would earn them a stamp on their card. The employer added 3''d'' worth of stamps and the government a further 2''d. ''In return, the worker received up to 26 weeks of sick pay at 10 shillings a week from a friendly society. There was also free medical care for the person ensure, but not for their family. The second part introduced unemployment pay – during times of unemployment, a worker would receive seven shillings per week for up to fifteen weeks, in return for a 2½''d ''per week. It was not much money, the government justified by stating it encouraged careful spending and prevented people to “sit back and enjoy” the benefits.</span></p>
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<p style="text-align:justify;text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-list:l2 level1 lfo3"><span style="font-family:Wingdings; mso-fareast-font-family:Wingdings;mso-bidi-font-family:Wingdings">§<span style="font:7.0pt "Times New Roman""> </span></span><span style="font-family:"Helvetica","sans-serif"">The Workers – in 1909 Labour Exchanges were made, but these did not increase the amount of jobs available in the country, so were relatively ineffective during periods of economic instability. Later on, starting in 1911, the National Insurance Act was brought in, in two parts. Part 1 dealt with health insurance. All men and women in lower-paid manual and clerical jobs earning under£160 per year had to join. They then had to pay 4''d ''out of each week’s wages, and each payment would earn them a stamp on their card. The employer added 3''d'' worth of stamps and the government a further 2''d. ''In return, the worker received up to 26 weeks of sick pay at 10 shillings a week from a friendly society. There was also free medical care for the person ensure, but not for their family. The second part introduced unemployment pay – during times of unemployment, a worker would receive seven shillings per week for up to fifteen weeks, in return for a 2½''d ''per week. It was not much money, the government justified by stating it encouraged careful spending and prevented people to “sit back and enjoy” the benefits. </span></p>
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<p style="text-align:justify">'''<span style="font-family:"Helvetica","sans-serif"">Free Trade</span>'''</p>
 
<p style="text-align:justify">'''<span style="font-family:"Helvetica","sans-serif"">Free Trade</span>'''</p>
   
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